Tips for the JET application: Part 3

As I lurk the message boards and see everyone frantically trying to get their materials together and asking questions about every little thing about the JET Program application, I am trying to think of more tips, and really only one come to mind.

Tip 6, Take all advice with a grain of salt: Okay, maybe not all, but at least 90% of the advice you’ll find online should be taken with a grain of salt. You see, since JET’s application process is so long and involved, it has this way of making everyone who has made it onto the program (and even people who didn’t) instantly think they’re experts on all JET matters. It also has a way of giving these new “experts” an undeniable urge to go online and dispense advice to JET hopefuls. All these people have may have good intentions, but that doesn’t mean their advice is sound. JET message boards and blogs are often a hodgepodge of conflicting information, half-truths, and downright falsehoods with the occasional facts and good advice sprinkled in.

So how do you separate the good advice from the bad? I say the best think you can do is consider who you’re hearing the information from.

JET Program Coordinators
Should you take their advice? Yes (most of the time)
In the last couple years, I’ve noticed an increased presence of program coordinators on message boards which I think is a great thing for JET hopefuls as they can clarify a lot of the misconceptions of JET and the application process. However it does make it clear that even within JET, some parts of the program are still a bit of a mystery and still vary greatly from country to country and even among consulates in the same country. I’ve also seen some of the coordinators dispense advices that’s based on their own personal preferences or pet-peeves about JET applicants and not based on anything official.

Current and Former JET Participants
Should you take their advice? Sometimes
Trust me, becoming a JET Participant doesn’t mean you get a book with JET’s selection secrets. You’re not told why your application or interview was better than others, or why you are placed where you’re placed. Just when you’re ready to say “I think this factor and that factor are very important to JET,” you’ll meet a JET who doesn’t fit the profile AT ALL. All a current/former JET can do is say “This was MY experience, and you may have a similar one or you may have something the opposite.”

Aspiring JET Participants
Should you take their advice? Um . . . probably not.
Seriously, every year I see a few know-it-alls dispensing advice on Statement of Purpose or how to chose their placement preferences and then I see they’re applying for JET as well! Aside from basic grammatical advice or generalĀ applicationĀ advice, an aspiring JET who’s pretending they know anything about the JET selection process, well-intentioned as they may be, is usually doing more harm than good.

So you’re applying to JET again

or “Tips for the 2nd time JET Program applicant”

*note* This post is for people who are applying to JET again after an unsuccessful attempt. If you have done JET and wish to do it again, check out the comment section.

It’s about that time again; the JET application is out soon and people are getting ready to subject themselves to the tortuously long process of applying to the JET Program on the promise of being to whisked away to the exotic land that is Japan. Many JET applicants will be bright-eyed first-time applicants, likely in the final year of their bachelor’s degree, having no reason to believe they won’t get the good news in April that a few short months after their graduation, they will be heading to Japan!

Then there are the 2nd time applicants, you know who you are. You sent in your carefully reviewed application last fall, were reasonably confident you would be selected over the multitude of ya-hoos that apply to the program, and then failed to get an interview. Maybe you still lurk around the message boards, filled with rage and/or sadness as you wondered how on earth all these people got in ahead of you. Maybe you flirted with going to Japan with Interac, or one of the eikaiwas. Never the less, here you are, planning to apply again.

The good news is you’ve already been through the whole application process, which does give you a leg up in some regards. But there’s probably plenty of room for improvement, here are a few tips. Continue reading

Welcome to Limbo: Being an Alternate for JET

Here you are, you started your JET Program journey half a year ago, you sent off your application last fall, waited six weeks, made it through the first round of cuts, another month went by, had your interview, and have now waited patiently 2+ months for results.

You finally get the email, it starts off “You have successfully passed the 2nd stage of the screening process”. You want to run around the room and shout “I’m going to Japan!” until you read the next sentence. “You have been selected as an alternate.”

I got this email, and I knew I was supposed to be grateful that I was an alternate. It meant I wasn’t rejected outright, and there was still a real chance of going to Japan. But in some ways it was worse than just being rejected. Being rejected would have meant that it’s over and done with, and it’s time to move on. As an alternate, all that laid ahead was weeks – possibly months – of uncertainty. When will I get the call? How much time will I have to prepare for Japan? What I can’t go? What if I’m never upgraded at all?!

Being an alternate kinda blows. It’s the ultimate limbo, you’re not in JET, but you’re not out. You’re sort of treated like a short-lister (you get some of the same paperwork, get invited to a few events), but at the same time you’re very much not a short-lister. You get asked if you’re going to Japan, and all you can say is “I don’t really know yet.” While short-listers get all sorts of checklists and guides to pre-departure, there is no “Official JET Alternate Guide”.

So here is the Unofficial JET Program Alternate Guide from someone who went through it.

Continue reading